Son Servant Steward Final Blog Header

Posted by Dr. Scott Solberg on Jan 25, 2017

TEACHING YOUR KIDS TO USE TECHNOLOGY WISELY

 

Recently, I came across this blog written by Trevin Wax and found it to be helpful parenting advice and I just want to pass it on to you.  It was written January 12, 2016.  https://blogs.thegospelcoalition.org/trevinwax/2016/01/12/4-principles-for-parenting-in-a-tech-saturated-world/

What can we do as parents to shape the habits of our children?

What can we do to help them make wise choices regarding the time they spend on electronic devices?

Do we ban devices and games? Do we set limits? What is the best way forward?

Many parents wrestle with these questions. I know, because my wife and I have discussed this issue with other couples on many occasions.

Our family has implemented a system that works well for us. I realize our way isn’t the only way, so I’ve asked a few Christian leaders and thinkers to share how they approach this issue. Below are some principles to consider.

1. INSTEAD OF BANNING ELECTRONIC DEVICES ALTOGETHER, TRAIN YOUR KIDS TO DISCIPLINE THEMSELVES.

The assumption among every family I spoke with is that there is a legitimate place for video games and iPhone apps and other forms of entertainment. Like watching television or listening to the radio, we can enjoy entertainment and leisure time in moderation.

Trillia Newbell, an author friend of mine, explained her family’s view: “We think devices are fine as long as they are monitored and have clear instructions, and restrictions.” In other words, it is better to help your children order their time wisely than to take away the opportunity to show self-control. Never use a device as a babysitter.

Aaron Earls, online editor of Facts and Trends, sees value in using video games for family time. On Friday nights, for example, his family will have a Wii family game night and everyone will play together. Electronic devices, in their proper place, can bring the family together instead of causing everyone to drift to separate rooms with separate screens.

2. NEVER ALLOW YOUR CHILDREN TO BE ALONE WITH UNFETTERED ACCESS TO ELECTRONIC DEVICES.

Kevin DeYoung, pastor of University Reformed Church and father of six children, confesses that it is difficult to keep up with everything all his kids are doing. But there is one rule his family won’t budge on: “No TV, computers, phones, or tablets in the bedroom. Screens are used in public areas, not in private.”

In the Wax home, our kids have limited access to our old, no-longer-in-use iPhones. But we set restrictions on those phones. That way, the kids are unable to unlock the phone, access the Internet, or make purchases. Take advantage of the restrictions settings on phones and tablets.

3. SET THE TIMER. 

When our kids play the Wii, they have to set the timer in the kitchen. When they play on our old iPhones, we set the Timer feature to “Stop Playing” so that the game shuts down and the phone locks when the timer goes off. Our rule is 30 minutes a day during the week, and an hour a day during the weekend.

Dan Darling, an author who works at the ERLC, limits his children’s screen time to an hour a day, with some give-and-take on holidays, special times, etc.

For Trillia Newbell’s family, the timer has been a huge help: “The kids know exactly what to expect and it helps eliminate confusion. It also gives them something to look forward to. They enjoy their time on devices much more now than before we implemented to timer. They focus on playing because they realize they’ll need to be off for the night/day otherwise.”

4. USE ELECTRONIC DEVICES AS MOTIVATION FOR READING.

A few years ago, I asked one of my favorite authors, N. D. Wilson, how parents can instill a love of reading in their kids. He told me that he and his wife allow their kids to stay up at night as long as they want, as long as they are reading. We tried that a few times, but our kids like to go to bed early.

What has helped them develop a love for reading is what we call “reading for time.” Our kids have the opportunity to earn more than their 30-minute-a-day allotment of electronics time by matching that time with reading. If they want to play games for 30 more minutes, great! But first, they must read for thirty minutes.

Our kids love this system. They’ve both taken to reading books they enjoy, and it helps them see electronic time as a privilege, not a right.  Aaron Earls’ family does something similar. In 30-minute segments, they can earn additional time on an electronic device. Using this method, his boys have already read classics like The Chronicles of Narnia and The Lord of the Rings.

CONCLUSION

I want my kids to enjoy the Nintendo and the iPhone and the creative worlds of Minecraft. But I also want them to enjoy playing outside, reading good books, and growing up as well-rounded kids. I’m thankful that my parents limited my access to Nintendo when I was growing up, and that’s why I can’t imagine setting them loose to play devices for hours on end.

The challenge for parents is to be consistent in the principles we put into practice in our homes. Make sure your kids understand why you’re setting limits. Discuss why certain games and shows are inappropriate. As Dan Darling says, “Try to instill in your kids a sense of discernment that will help them when they leave the nest.”

That’s right. Discernment and self-control, where you can take time for leisure without letting leisure take over your time.

Comments

Name: